Prairie Dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) spoor-OB-oh-lus heterolepis

Other Names Sporobolus heterolepis (Prairie Dropseed), Sporobolus heterolepis 1 Gal., GRASS SPOROBOLIS PRAIRIE DROPSEED, Sporobolus heterolepis (NGN), G Sporobolus heterolepis
Family Poaceae
Why Like Many birds rely on the seeds of this native grass.
Description

A preferred native grass for prairie gardens, Prairie Dropseed adds a touch of elegance to any planting. A burst of flowering panicles on slender stems float above the tufted grass in late summer in tints of pink and brown. The bloom has a unique fragrance with hints of coriander. In fall the foliage color turns to hues of gold. Considered by many to be the most handsome of the prairie grasses, Prairie Dropseed makes a well-defined and distinctive border when planted 18 to 24 inches apart. Plains Indians ground the seed to make a tasty flour. Plant the seed in fall or early spring for best results.

Named Cultivars Sporobolus heterolepis 'Golden Prairie', Sporobolus heterolepis 'Tara'
Plant Data
I am a... Deciduous Perennial Arching, Clump
Why to Like Many birds rely on the seeds of this native grass.
Mature Size 24 - 48 inches tall. 18 - 24 inches wide.
Growth Rate Slow
Moisture Tolerance Dry - Medium: Widely Adaptable
Zones 3a - 9b
Tags Attracts Birds, Drought Tolerant, Grasses, Illinois Native, Most Popular, Popular For Fall Fall Blooming Perennials, Ornamental Grass
Bloom Period August to September
Flower Color Pink And Brown-Tinted
Foliage Color
Animals That Use It

Seeds:

 
Data Sheets
   In the Landscape Focused on the Plant Leaves Flowers Fruit Fall Leaf Winter Form
 
 

More Photos: Google Image Search & Flickr

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